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Takin (Budorcas taxicolor)
The takin is a goat-antelope found in the eastern Himalayas. Mitochondrial research shows the takin is related to sheep; its similarity to the muskox is an example of convergent evolution. Takin are found from forested valleys to rocky, grass-covered alpine zones, at altitudes between 1,000 and 4,500 m above sea level. Takin are found in small family groups of around 20 individuals, although older males may lead more solitary existences. In the summer, herds of up to 300 individuals gather high on the mountain slopes. When disturbed, individuals give a ‘cough’ alarm call and the herd retreats into thick bamboo thickets and lies on the ground for camouflage. Takin feed in the early morning and late afternoon, grazing on a variety of leaves and grasses, as well as bamboo shoots and flowers. Largely due to overhunting and the destruction of their natural habitat, takin are considered Endangered in China and Vulnerable per the IUCN. Though they are not a common species naturally, their numbers appear to have been reduced considerably.
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cool-critters:

Takin (Budorcas taxicolor)
The takin is a goat-antelope found in the eastern Himalayas. Mitochondrial research shows the takin is related to sheep; its similarity to the muskox is an example of convergent evolution. Takin are found from forested valleys to rocky, grass-covered alpine zones, at altitudes between 1,000 and 4,500 m above sea level. Takin are found in small family groups of around 20 individuals, although older males may lead more solitary existences. In the summer, herds of up to 300 individuals gather high on the mountain slopes. When disturbed, individuals give a ‘cough’ alarm call and the herd retreats into thick bamboo thickets and lies on the ground for camouflage. Takin feed in the early morning and late afternoon, grazing on a variety of leaves and grasses, as well as bamboo shoots and flowers. Largely due to overhunting and the destruction of their natural habitat, takin are considered Endangered in China and Vulnerable per the IUCN. Though they are not a common species naturally, their numbers appear to have been reduced considerably.
Zoom Info
cool-critters:

Takin (Budorcas taxicolor)
The takin is a goat-antelope found in the eastern Himalayas. Mitochondrial research shows the takin is related to sheep; its similarity to the muskox is an example of convergent evolution. Takin are found from forested valleys to rocky, grass-covered alpine zones, at altitudes between 1,000 and 4,500 m above sea level. Takin are found in small family groups of around 20 individuals, although older males may lead more solitary existences. In the summer, herds of up to 300 individuals gather high on the mountain slopes. When disturbed, individuals give a ‘cough’ alarm call and the herd retreats into thick bamboo thickets and lies on the ground for camouflage. Takin feed in the early morning and late afternoon, grazing on a variety of leaves and grasses, as well as bamboo shoots and flowers. Largely due to overhunting and the destruction of their natural habitat, takin are considered Endangered in China and Vulnerable per the IUCN. Though they are not a common species naturally, their numbers appear to have been reduced considerably.
Zoom Info

cool-critters:

Takin (Budorcas taxicolor)

The takin is a goat-antelope found in the eastern Himalayas. Mitochondrial research shows the takin is related to sheep; its similarity to the muskox is an example of convergent evolution. Takin are found from forested valleys to rocky, grass-covered alpine zones, at altitudes between 1,000 and 4,500 m above sea level. Takin are found in small family groups of around 20 individuals, although older males may lead more solitary existences. In the summer, herds of up to 300 individuals gather high on the mountain slopes. When disturbed, individuals give a ‘cough’ alarm call and the herd retreats into thick bamboo thickets and lies on the ground for camouflage. Takin feed in the early morning and late afternoon, grazing on a variety of leaves and grasses, as well as bamboo shoots and flowers. Largely due to overhunting and the destruction of their natural habitat, takin are considered Endangered in China and Vulnerable per the IUCN. Though they are not a common species naturally, their numbers appear to have been reduced considerably.

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